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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 530 (some duplicates have been removed)
portion of the program will be moderated by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 14 when his family emigrated from cuba under harrowing circumstances, including last minute detention by the secret police. he made it here. in two lines -- and two lines come to mind when i think of him. "this is my country, land of my choice. this is my country, here i found voice." what a voice it is. he earned his aba at the university of florida and he is now in their hall of fame. he is a partner in the miami office of the national law firm. his clients range from former vice president al gore to philip morris, to the nation
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
a more abundant california. as legislators, it's your duty and privilege to pass laws. what we need to do for our future will require producing hundreds of new laws each year. the great writer of the 16th century wisely wrote, there is little relation between our actions, which are in perpetball mutation. the most desirable laws are the rarest, simplest and most general. think it would be better to have none at all than in such numbers as we have. constantly expanding the coercive power of government by adding each year so many minute prescriptions to detailed legal system overshadows other aspects of public service. individual creativity and direct leadership must also play a part. we do this not by commanding thou shall or thou shall not but to organize people. lay the ten commandments next to the education code and you'll see how far we diverged in approaching content to that forms the basis of our legal system. in the right order of things, education, the early fashioning of character and the formation of conscience, comes before legislation. nothing is more determinant of our future
and you'll hear from our studio audience, a former law enforcement official, gun rights activists who know firsthand why so many americans have chosen to arm themselves in order to protect their families. first, let's recap what was proposed earlier this we thiek. in addition, the president outlined legislative proposals and calling for the passage of a universal background check, something that critics say could lead to a gun ordinance data base and wants the assault weapons ban reinstated, an a ten round limit on magazines, and restrictions on bullets that can be possessed and manufactured and discussed a new gun trafficking law that penalizes those who help criminals obtain firearms, on wednesday, the americans called on americans to pressure their ehe lekted representatives in supporting these measures. let's take a look. >> get them on record, ask your member of congress if they support universal background checks to keep guns out of the wrong hands, ask if they support a ban on military style assault weapons and high capacity magazines, if they say no, ask them why not. ask them what
ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays
by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program for lower income americans. it's an important program. as governor, i dealt with it in my state, but when i was governor, it was 8% of the state budget. today it's 26% of the state budget. it's soaking up every dollar or almost every dollar that would go to higher education. as a result, students around the country are wondering well, why are my tuition fees going up? it's because of washington's medicaid program requiring states to make decisions that soak uponey that otherwise would go for colleges and universities. in our state of tennessee, 30 years ago, the state paid 70% of the cost of going to the university of tennessee. today it pays 30%, and medicaid is the chief culprit. now, everyone knows this. i mean, the president's own debt commission has told him this and suggested a way to deal with it. 40 or 50 of us on both sides of the aisle have bee
like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to unanother must be equal, as well. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright, young students and engineers are listed in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. we know that america thrives when every person can find independence and pride in their work. when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed when a little girl born in to the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else. >> and joining me now with his reaction to the president's speech yesterday, democratic congressman from maryland, chris van hollen. thank you so much for your time. >> it's great to be with you, tamron. >> as have perhaps read yourself or heard "the new york times" is calling the president's unapologetic, evolved. we ask the question, is this the liberal reagan? what is your thoughts on this
coming together of law enforcement, educators and industry and a variety of other folks and nonprofits organizations and really understand the issue and dive into it. it's been awesome and a ton of learning has gone into this. alice is amazing. everything that happened with time warner and got together a year ago and partnered up on this and wouldn't it be great if we got two major media organizations together, one traditional media which has a a lot of strength in eaching people via tv and one reaching people socially and if you could gather these together imagine what we can do? and so i think you called sizzle real. it was a sizzling experience to be in a high school in hare land and felt like a football pep rally but it was about bullying and they all took the pledge to stop it when they see it and amazing experience and tip of the hat to time warner to really understanding the issue and putting the weight of the media empire behind it to reach people, and second of all understanding how you sort -- there is the bully and there is the person being bullied but what if we got the
suspension of the tobacco sales permit. the reason for suspension, violation of state law and the san francisco health code which proprohibit the indoor smoking of tobacco products. director's case no. smk12-09 and we'll start with the appellant. you have seven minutes >> good evening, my name is bashir shahin, the owner of marrakech restaurant. thank you to the board of appeals for giving us a chance to express our thoughts and feelings. i am not here to argue or ask for anything unreasonable. just hoping that you will give us some leniency andtry to give us some mercy on this case, which is a small family business, trying to keep our doors open. we have been in business for the last 16 years. i have clean record with all departments. for the last few years we have been hit very hard by the recession and economy and it's been hard to keep our doors as well. we like to comply with the ordinance, with any laws that come through. just this particular matter is kind of confusing and that is why we got into this argument. and we're hoping to resolve it and get better results from this.
of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we were not notified of the report being issued today. indeed we found about it a couple of days ago by happenstance. we are shocked by the lack of substance. when members met with the chief in 2012 he assured us he would include information which we outlined in a letter sent to him on june 8, and to address another question that was presented by commissioner several meetings happened with the chief and staff happened in july and september and after the signing of the ordinance. in short we are disappointed that despite the verbal assurances this report failed to include anymore any useful information regarding the work and this lack of information makes it impossible for the public to have true accountability to know what the police department is doing with regard to this issue. a five minute presentation is not sufficient to that and my colleague will speak on the details of this. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you m
. all of that talk about coffee and the gentleman talking about going through law school in the '70s and i can relate to that experience going through night school. having a hard time trying to stay awake during procedures class. i recall a professor making key points and one thing he always said, you should always examine the issue of jurisdiction. i have two primary points on that issue. today as indicated or foreshadowed by brief the appellant decided to file an exemption and declare that they are going to be bond on the jurisdiction of the state of california. the california massage therapy council. i have that, if you could bring up the projector, please? it was filed today. >> what is this document sorry, i missed what you said it was. >> it's entitled -- this first one -- there is two of them. i'm sorry. for a state certified massage establishment. as you can see it's in order and has been received by environmental health section. there is also -- this actually goes to the planning department, but you file it through the health department. there is also a companion doc
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
with the review of the department general order log which is a law with basic details, not a lot of activities that and i want to thank lieutenant gracie that went out of her way to meet the commissioners and we get a chance to review it and i appreciate that and it's done regally and i want to recognize the department's work in doing that. also we received a letter about meetings with the community and wondered if the chief wanted to give some comment on that. looks like there was a meeting in june. >> i think these were the meetings that preceded the ordinance. >> okay thank you. >> any further questions? dr. marshall. >> just because i heard this come up before and i want to reiterate what you said and what commissioner mazzucco said regarding this issue the chief said a number of times in public. i don't know how many times you need to say it chief. he stated how officers are handled with this issue. i just want the public to be reassured when the chief says that's the way it is that's the way it is. >> okay. thank you. >> thank you. oh public comment. >> we're still going on presenta
has become inefficient. law enforcement needs to be one component along with courts and treatment programs and reentry program in preventing drug abuse and with crime and family break down. this is way from [inaudible] focusing on dealers. there are law enforcement alternatives for the sfpd to consider. i wanted to mention one and a pilot program in seattle washington that could be used as an alternative and small time drug dealers are deterred into community services rather than jail. the approach has been successful in the united kingdom. whether african-americans deal drugs at 18 times of the population or seven times the rate in other cities is maybe increasingly irrelevant. the gap of what race gets arrested from selling drugs and what race dies from using drugs is significant and requires a balanced approach and the city needs to transition to policies reducing drug abuse. over the past decade san francisco law enforcement has prioritizing arresting drug dealers over consumers and focus on the drug dealing likely done by minorities. the choices have not searched san fr
particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that i
, local law enforcement, local da's, people who are getting out of their lanes. the old paradigm of a da and a attorney and a police officer, you get bad guys, you put them this jail. you know, i'm telling you, i've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and i across the cou
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
. this time from louisiana. a local newspaper in danvers talking about a little-known state law that will make residents pay more at the grocery store. alysian requires that grocers markup milk prices 6% above the invoice and shipping costs, 6%. a local store called fresh market has a weekly special, gallons of milk for $2.99 each and every tuesday. not anymore. the state is worried such deals to drive competitors out of business. isn't that what free-market are about? if they want to compete, lower prices. if not, what consumers walk up the door. that's my "2 cents more." it's obvious. coming in tomorrow, president obama's says deficit reduction is not a goal unto itself. shouldn't it be? of every action. that's it for tonight on "the willis report." thank you for joining us. have a great night, and we will see right back here tomorrow. ♪ lou: good evening, everybody. a lot to cover tonight. the white house has made it clear for some time that the initiative to change immigration laws and the status of more than 11 million people in this country illegally would be a priority this year and,
, in fact, next week with the commit staff working on the bill to have california's law conform for the federal law. cap and trade another very large statewide issue. san francisco as a city family is engaging on that through our advocacy, our lobbyists, as well as the league of cities, california state association of counties and others who have an interest in making sure that local government and transportation programs in particular, given that transportation emits 38% of the state's greenhouse gas emissions do see some benefit from the auction revenues that are generated. 4 and 5 together, 4 we really are looking at the final closeout of the high speed rail bond program, which san francisco has received its allocation from that. and the companion proposition 1b we received really great news that $117 million check is being suspect for the central project. that project has proven it's readiness to spend those kind of funds and our project in san francisco is a really good example to the state in terms of readiness, if you will for these bond programs. leading to what does the
be allowed to stay and not have to be held accountable for the law that they have broken. that is the debate that's unfolding right now. and today the lead democrat of this measure, new york senator chuck schumer talked about it in terms that will have some concern for amnesty. opponents because, in effect. amp the hurtles are cleared. they would be allowed to stay. watch. >> immediately, when the bill passes. people who are here living in the shadows, would get a legal right to stay here and work. they would no longer be deported provided they don't have a criminal record. >> well, supporters say that that provision that they don't have a criminal record in addition to a background check, in addition to paying fines, paying taxes and going to the back of a whole series of lines, be it for work or residency or ultimately a green card and citizenship means that it's not amnesty. that's going to be debated once again aprogressively and it all starts tomorrow when the president lays down his marker, shep? >> shepard: on his plan, karl, something similar to this of that on the house or exactly t
: people say tougher gun laws. views say the opposite. and you wrote a book about it. explain your reasoning. >> at that time you could not get a concealed carry permit. they did not exist. i would leave my gun in my car we were having lunch. a mad man drove his truck to the window and began executing people. i cannot tell you what it is like to be a fish in a girl waiting to be your turn. it just prevented us from being able to protect ourselves. john: leland yee you disagree? >> i used to work in the school as a psychologist. i don't know if any teacher or administrator that wants to carry a gun into a classroom or school. then why not supermarkets? hospitals? john: find. >> that is not the way we want to operate. in california we are about educating kids not to pack a gun and shoot them if somebody comes into your school. >> we're not talking about the children to carry weapons for the people who can already carry in the supermarkets. >> what is the lesson that we say to the kids? when you grow up to solve your problem carry a gun? that should not be the life lesson. john: the p
of security or law enforcement there because i believe when there is official law enforcement there -- i can't think of a euphemism for this but the bums and crack heads won't be at our doors. we won't get threatened and harassed. there have been life-threatening comments. there have been fights right inside of the store. just mainly that safety concern that is getting in the way of doing our business and we have been there -- this march marks three years of our anniversary of doing business there. i want to give sfpd credit. we have seen a substantial improvement. we appreciate them coming down there a few times but we kind of want to see a consistent presence and maybe build some relationship with the businesses, like something on a first name business. it would be nice to have a police officer or whoever come down, introduce themselves, and let us know that they're there at least, and just so we can have that feeling that -- that comforting feeling because for businesses and people that come to the area it's not comforting taw. we had a customer last night staying at a hotel one blo
rest on our way out of this problem. i no longer want to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must hav
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 530 (some duplicates have been removed)